Adult Corgi Gear

This is a discussion on Adult Corgi Gear within the General Corgi Discussions forums, part of the General category; Charlie is 5 1/2 months now and is on the verge of outgrowing his "puppy gear". I'd like to know ...

  1. #1
    MyPemCharlie's Avatar
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    Adult Corgi Gear

    Charlie is 5 1/2 months now and is on the verge of outgrowing his "puppy gear". I'd like to know what people are using on a few items before I purchase "adult gear".

    1) Collar and Leash - Charlie is currently using a 3/8" flat collar and 3/8" leash, which seem a little now that we're walking everyday. We're working on walking loose on leash and the thin little leash hurts my hand when he tries to pull ahead. I'm trying to decide if 1/2" or 5/8" would be best. Most trainers require a 6 foot lead for classwork.

    What is you dog's collar width? Leather or nylon? Do you use several types of leads? If so, what particular uses do you find for each type.

    2) Crate/Kennel - I took my large plastic 24" long cat carrier out to pick Charlie up from the breeder, and that has been his bed at night. He can still stand up, lie down and turn around ok. However, we all know how Corgi's like to lie on their back or stomach with their feet fully extended behind them, and Charlie is too long to fully stretch out. I'd like to get a crate or kennel which will work the rest of his life, (not buy and "intermediate" and have to purchase another larger one later).

    What type of kennel are you using and dimensions? If you take a yard stick or tape measure, how long is your dog when he/she is "fully extended" (feet out back) from "nose to toes"?

    3) Car restraint - I've been moving Charlie's kennel to the car and seat-belting it through the crate handle when we go on road adventures. It's kind of a pain to move from the bedroom to the car and back again. A larger kennel is certainly going to be even more work. I've wondered about harnesses and if they strap the dog in securely somehow. I may also just end up with a second kennel to leave in the car permanently.

    Do you transport you dog in a kennel or use some sort of harness device? For harness users, does a standard harness strap in the seat belt, or do you need a special "car harness"?

    That's all I can think of right now for gear. If you have some other dog gear you find particularly helpful, I'd love to hear about it. Thanks in advance for your input!
    Chris & Charlie

    He Ain't Heavy, He's My Corgi!
  2. #2
    Louwants's Avatar
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    Well, as far as transporting in a car, I did buy a seat belt harnass for Duncan when he was young, but I don't use it anymore. I could never get the thing on him without a battle and he could still just about get into the front seat with it on. He hates car rides, so we don't go on them much. He whines the whole time, has since I picked him up. I probably reinforced the whining, me holding him and petting him on the way home. I only had plans to check him out, not on getting him. (I tried to do the first observe and check out other pups). But, as soon as I saw him, he had to come home. I had been wanting a corgi again for so long, and my husband said he wish he had a camera to take my picture when I first saw him. He said he has never seen my face and eyes light up so much! I still remember how excited I was also when I saw him. Just like a kid who got that special present at Christmas.
  3. #3
    Freppan's Avatar
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    I didn't know that there were car harnesses for them, I will have to pick one of those up if I ever get my little baby.

    I'm also curious about what type of material is best for a leash. So I will definitely stick around this topic.

    Also, Lou, that story was really cute.
    ---
  4. #4
    Louwants's Avatar
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    Thanks Freppan. I'm sure when you finally get your corgi, you will light up also.

    My first words was "Look! His ears are already up at 8 weeks!" He is a handful, and I tell him that's why he was the last one left...he was rotten! He's a big boy, bigger than most, and his weight is a problem keeping it down. Especially, since if I don't watch him like a hawk, he scarfs down Chloe's food and then goes to his. Chloe is a nibbler/hider. She'll take a mouthful and "bury" it in the carpet or under rugs. Ducan comes along and gobbles it down as quick as she hides it.
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    Charlie is 5 1/2 months now and is on the verge of outgrowing his "puppy gear". I'd like to know what people are using on a few items before I purchase "adult gear".

    1) Collar and Leash - Charlie is currently using a 3/8" flat collar and 3/8" leash, which seem a little now that we're walking everyday. We're working on walking loose on leash and the thin little leash hurts my hand when he tries to pull ahead. I'm trying to decide if 1/2" or 5/8" would be best. Most trainers require a 6 foot lead for classwork.
    My guys wear either rolled leather collars or nylon limited slip collars (or soft slip collars White Pine Outfitters - Soft Web Collars ).

    What is you dog's collar width?
    I belive the nylon ones are about 9/16".

    Do you use several types of leads? If so, what particular uses do you find for each type.
    Yes:

    Nylon 6': used for walking when the dogs can have some room to walk in front of me.

    Flexi: used for potty breaks when traveling or at dogs shows (away from the show ring area). I personally do not like flexi's for going for walks. I want more control of my dog than this gives me.

    thin leather lead about 4': used for showing or for walking at shows.

    thin nylon leads about 4': used for showing only

    leather braded leash about 2 1/2 - 3': used for obedience training. (Nope, I don't use 6 foot leashes for training.)

    50' long line: used for long distance obedience training, advanced classes and lessons (for long distance recalls, proofing stays, etc. NEVER used for walking or heeling)

    2) Crate/Kennel - I took my large plastic 24" long cat carrier out to pick Charlie up from the breeder, and that has been his bed at night. He can still stand up, lie down and turn around ok. However, we all know how Corgi's like to lie on their back or stomach with their feet fully extended behind them, and Charlie is too long to fully stretch out. I'd like to get a crate or kennel which will work the rest of his life, (not buy and "intermediate" and have to purchase another larger one later).
    Most of my guys sleep in the "medium" or 200 sized vari kennels. And this is what they travel in too. A few who are longer have the "intermediate" or 300 sized crates.

    3) Car restraint - I've been moving Charlie's kennel to the car and seat-belting it through the crate handle when we go on road adventures. It's kind of a pain to move from the bedroom to the car and back again. A larger kennel is certainly going to be even more work.
    I have extra crates that I use for traveling. That way we don't have to move them around.

    I may also just end up with a second kennel to leave in the car permanently.
    Yup, that's the idea. If only taking one dog the crate is on the floor of the van. If taking three or four dogs the crates are staced and we use bungee cords to secure them to each other. This has worked for many years with many dogs and different sized crates. (And different breeds too.)

    Crates are the safest for traveling. If you are in an accident the dog can be taken out of the car and transported to the vet or shelter without the police having to handle a frightened and possibly injured dog. If crated the dog cannot "protect" you if you need medical attention. Chances are if they have to chose between saving your life and fighting with your dog to do it your dog would loose. (Meaing they'd shoot him.) And in a crate they can open the car door or if the door springs open the dog is not let loose to run free and get hit or get lost.

    Peggy
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    Jim & Peggy Newman
    mailto: taflarpwc@yahoo.com
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    I don't think it is very important what material your Corgi's collar and leash is made of. It is probably nicer and better to have a collar and leash that is attractive and colour co-ordinated, yet not long lasting or expensive so that you can quite frequently replace them. Also that way, you won't get 'sick' of them either.
  7. #7
    MyPemCharlie's Avatar
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    My guys wear either rolled leather collars or nylon limited slip collars (or soft slip collars White Pine Outfitters - Soft Web Collars ).
    Thank you for the link. I haven't seen anything like the soft-slip in stores here. That looks like it might be a better training collar than Charlie's flat collar.




    Nylon 6': used for walking when the dogs can have some room to walk in front of me.

    Flexi: used for potty breaks when traveling or at dogs shows (away from the show ring area). I personally do not like flexi's for going for walks. I want more control of my dog than this gives me.

    thin leather lead about 4': used for showing or for walking at shows.

    thin nylon leads about 4': used for showing only

    leather braded leash about 2 1/2 - 3': used for obedience training. (Nope, I don't use 6 foot leashes for training.)

    50' long line: used for long distance obedience training, advanced classes and lessons (for long distance recalls, proofing stays, etc. NEVER used for walking or heeling)
    I've been thinking about a shorter lead for walking. I've ended up tieing slip-knots in his 5 ft lead, so it ends up being about 2 1/2 feet. I also want to make a long line when I remember to buy a clip. I'm not sure why, but almost all the trainers here require a flat buckle collar and a 6 ft lead...beats me!



    Most of my guys sleep in the "medium" or 200 sized vari kennels. And this is what they travel in too. A few who are longer have the "intermediate" or 300 sized crates. I have extra crates that I use for traveling. That way we don't have to move them around.
    Maybe I'll look at the 300. That would be 8 inches longer than his current kennel. I'd rather give him a little extra room, than have him a little cramped. In the 300, are your dogs able to completely stretch out?



    Crates are the safest for traveling. If you are in an accident the dog can be taken out of the car and transported to the vet or shelter without the police having to handle a frightened and possibly injured dog. If crated the dog cannot "protect" you if you need medical attention. Chances are if they have to chose between saving your life and fighting with your dog to do it your dog would loose. (Meaing they'd shoot him.) And in a crate they can open the car door or if the door springs open the dog is not let loose to run free and get hit or get lost.

    Peggy
    You have a lot of good points about safety. I remember 20 or more years ago when everyone just threw their dogs in the car to "flop" around everywhere! Actually, I still see that quite a bit. I definitely don't want Charlie flying through the air into the windshield if I have to make a sudden emergency stop...or got into a wreck!

    Thanks Peggy! As usual, lots of good information.
    Chris & Charlie

    He Ain't Heavy, He's My Corgi!
  8. #8
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    Thank you for the link. I haven't seen anything like the soft-slip in stores here. That looks like it might be a better training collar than Charlie's flat collar.
    I really like them. They can be used as everyday collars or as a training collar or both.

    I've been thinking about a shorter lead for walking. I've ended up tieing slip-knots in his 5 ft lead, so it ends up being about 2 1/2 feet. I also want to make a long line when I remember to buy a clip. I'm not sure why, but almost all the trainers here require a flat buckle collar and a 6 ft lead...beats me!
    Well, my first obedience leash was a 6 foot one. I quickly learned I didn't need one that long. So got a shorter one. I really like the short one for training. You are rarely working very far from your dog esp. in the beginning so you don't really need such a long leash. IMO, anyway. (And the trainers I've worked with anyway.)

    Maybe I'll look at the 300. That would be 8 inches longer than his current kennel. I'd rather give him a little extra room, than have him a little cramped. In the 300, are your dogs able to completely stretch out?
    Yup, they can. Altough they often sleep crosswise in the back.

    you have a lot of good points about safety. I remember 20 or more years ago when everyone just threw their dogs in the car to "flop" around everywhere! Actually, I still see that quite a bit. I definitely don't want Charlie flying through the air into the windshield if I have to make a sudden emergency stop...or got into a wreck!
    Having been in a couple of close calls, one where we ended up in a ditch. The dogs were in crates, bungee'd together. (we had at least 4 with us, 2 whippets and 2 corgis) The crates never moved. The dogs, like us, were a bit shaken up, but no one was hurt.

    Thanks Peggy! As usual, lots of good information.
    Glad to help.

    Peggy
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    Jim & Peggy Newman
    mailto: taflarpwc@yahoo.com
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    They make crates that have a moveable wall so you can change the dimensions as they get older. That's what we have for our Corgi's.
  10. #10
    Freppan's Avatar
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    Can anyone tell me more about the car harness things? How much do they cost?
    ---
  11. #11
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    Man you should see my leash rack--it's got a little bit of everything over the years.

    Collars-I like the Lupine brand as they have a 100% guarantee-even if chewed in 1/2. Considering that one of my girls hates collars, I've replaced 4 of her's! Once my guys turn a year old they all get an adjustable one with their own design on it-makes it easier to tell who's collar is who's. It has the safety release and their id tags on it. They only wear them when traveling. Rolled leather collars are great too and I have those for the collies and the toy dogs as they don't mat their hair as badly. I also like Mes Amies collars-usually the kennel leads, for the show dogs. Lots of the golden people in my area use them as they don't create wear patterns on the show coats and are great to use at the shows.

    I also have a nice training collar with no tags on it. Variety used here. No chokes at all. Tight fitting flat buckle collar, martingale or grey hound collar or pinch collar. All depends on which dog, what we are training for and their attitude of the day. My rough collie Claire(the one in the photo with the cardigan puppy) uses the lightest show collar I can find, as I really don't need a training collar for her at this age but just need something on her.

    Leashes-invest in a nice leather leash. It will last beyond your dog and can be repaired easily if chewed. It's much easier on your dog when training and on you too as it has give that nylon doesn't. 6' or 4'. It might be stiff to begin with but after running it through your hands while watching TV a few nights, it turns into a nice buttery soft texture. Nylon can burn your skin if it's pulled through your hand. Also, once chewed, hard to find someone to repair them.

    Flexi-lead-get the real ones as the cheap ones won't last. Use for walking but not for training unless you are working on long sits, long distance recalls.

    Crates-my adults sleep in 400 vari kennels, or 36" wire crates. I tend to go big. Albert the 5 mo old puppy is in a 400 vari kennel and is very happy in there. I have an addiction for crates :0) All shapes and sizes. I always crate my dogs when driving and make sure the crate is secured in the truck so that it won't bounce around in case of an accident. After the accident where Marg became the million dollar dog, I don't think harnesses are a wise idea. In the truck I use a smaller crate then what they sleep in so that they don't bounce around.

    I also have a special bag for the dog gear. Make sure that you keep it up out of reach as they will get into to it! I've had them get in and find the treats, drape leashes all over the house and then hide the collars in strange places.

    I make dog beds for my guys out of old pillowcases-insert a couple layers of poly fill, sew up the end, run a row of stitching down the middle. Cheap, easy to launder, has my smell on it and if they chew it up, no biggy to replace.
    Cindy and the crew at Foggy Bottom
    www.foggybottomusa.com
  12. #12
    Louwants's Avatar
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    Freppan, I sent you a personal link to one that is available on Ebay. It shows how they work.
  13. #13
    MyPemCharlie's Avatar
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    Thanks Cindy! You and Peggy have given me some good ideas for gear which I haven't found in the normal large-box retail pet supply stores. Wish I hadn't sold my rottweiler's first puppy crate on craigslist for half price. He outgrew it in 3 months, and I think is was a Vari Kennel 400...would have come in handy for Charlie's adult kennel.
    Chris & Charlie

    He Ain't Heavy, He's My Corgi!

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