Corgis in the cold. ????????

This is a discussion on Corgis in the cold. ???????? within the General Corgi Discussions forums, part of the General category; I have read that Corgis do well in cold weather, and I would think herding dogs in general would need ...

  1. #1
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    Corgis in the cold. ????????

    I have read that Corgis do well in cold weather, and I would think herding dogs in general would need to be OK in various weather conditions. I know he has an under coat of fur for warmth. From loooking at Pembrokeshire and the town of Pembroke on line it looks as if the winter would be cold and not much shelter too.


    I still wonder when Bailey loves to go out when it is in the 20's or 30's F and just wants lie in the snow and look at me when I walk inside the house. I have not left him out more than about 20 minutes in that temperature, unless we are together walking and generating some heat. We walk together in the cold for over a mile if the snow is not too deep. He can travel when the snow is 10" deep, I don't take him far. But he loves it.
    I also wonder about him getting ice in his toes. He love the snow at the dog park. He likes to eat snow and rub himself all over on ice. It is very rare that it goes below 20 F around here during the day. I have some new winter gear for myself, I'm hoping for a blizzard and some single digit temps, so I can try it out.
    My thought is I would leave him inside in those condtions

    What have others got to say about Corgis in the cold?

    Any suggestions? Experiences?
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    I don't think of Corgis as Antarctic dogs eg dogs suited to the winters of Siberia, Greenland, the Northern outreaches of Canada, snow capped mountains etc; but they are definitely dogs for the cool and temperate climates as their double, reasonably thick coats testify towards. They are not dogs for the hot climates and regions of the world with 12 months of warm to hot temperatures. A searing sun is their enemy and Corgis will seek shade and a cool spot away from the sun. To put it another way, Corgis are not suitable in the huge heartland of Australia, or in North Africa but would be very suited to live in such places as Vancouver in Canada or Wellington in New Zealand or Britain where summers are short and the other three seasons more prevalent.
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    I have read that Corgis do well in cold weather, and I would think herding dogs in general would need to be OK in various weather conditions. I know he has an under coat of fur for warmth. From loooking at Pembrokeshire and the town of Pembroke on line it looks as if the winter would be cold and not much shelter too.

    I still wonder when Bailey loves to go out when it is in the 20's or 30's F and just wants lie in the snow and look at me when I walk inside the house. I have not left him out more than about 20 minutes in that temperature, unless we are together walking and generating some heat. We walk together in the cold for over a mile if the snow is not too deep. He can travel when the snow is 10" deep, I don't take him far. But he loves it.
    I also wonder about him getting ice in his toes. He love the snow at the dog park. He likes to eat snow and rub himself all over on ice. It is very rare that it goes below 20 F around here during the day. I have some new winter gear for myself, I'm hoping for a blizzard and some single digit temps, so I can try it out.
    My thought is I would leave him inside in those condtions

    What have others got to say about Corgis in the cold?

    Any suggestions? Experiences?
    As a rule, corgis do well in the cold and enjoy playing in the snow.

    Currently I live in the mountains in Utah. Between the Wasatch and Uinta ranges. We have weeks where we don't even reach freezing for a high. (Last week for instance, high 20's was considered warm. LOL!) Right now, in the winter my dogs go outside in the barn stalls. I leave the all but the old dogs out for several hours at a time. Now, they do have shelter, they're not in the ice and snow, and there are insulated dog houses in the barn stalls too.

    The older guys (12 & 13 years) I put out long enough to go potty and they come back in.

    Now when we lived in the valley, (SLC), we would let the dogs run in the yard for an hour or two depending on the temps.

    As for ice between the toes, just wipe his feet off when he comes in. Usually if they get some there that's bothering them while they're out they'll bite it off themselves.

    I would not go off and leave a dog outside in 20F or lower temps. Their water freezes and they would need a good dog house if you must do that. I'd think it would be better for them to only be out when you can check on them and make sure they're not getting too cold.

    Peggy
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    I would not go off and leave a dog outside in 20F or lower temps. Their water freezes and they would need a good dog house if you must do that. I'd think it would be better for them to only be out when you can check on them and make sure they're not getting too cold.

    Peggy

    Thanks for your input, you too Michael.

    In case you are wondering, Bailey never gets left alone outside in any temperature, unless I am home and watching or can hear him. I left him out for a few minutes in the snow, because he seemed to be having a good time. I can see him from inside. In warmer temps he comes back in after taking care of bussiness. He has a dog house in the living room.
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    In case you are wondering, Bailey never gets left alone outside in any temperature, unless I am home and watching or can hear him. I left him out for a few minutes in the snow, because he seemed to be having a good time. I can see him from inside. In warmer temps he comes back in after taking care of bussiness. He has a dog house in the living room.
    It was just a comment for whoever else might be reading. Sometimes people who lurk have the same type questions but just don't ask. Sometimes I try to add extra info in case someone is wondering...


    Peggy
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    Jim & Peggy Newman
    mailto: taflarpwc@yahoo.com
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    It was just a comment for whoever else might be reading. Sometimes people who lurk have the same type questions but just don't ask. Sometimes I try to add extra info in case someone is wondering...


    Peggy

    Good idea.

    From a couple of days ago.......





  7. #7
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    Corgis just love the snow and can spend some good time in it.
    Will get to the snow with Taylor yet.
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    Duchess is rather a short legged corgi. If we have deep snow like the last two storms, it is hard for her to slough through it and find a place to potty. We break a trail and she will do her thing and then next time she wants a new spot to use. Hardly ever the same place twice.

    If however the snow is just a few inches she loves to run and cavort. Yes, cavort is the right word. She is not a terribly playful dog so any rolling and prancing is a treat to see.

    I imagine Bailey is a taller dog. Ten inches would just about bury Duchess. She cannot make headway in over seven inches,
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    See Jane, Corgis find their 'poison' - the dignified Duchess prancing, dancing and cavorting about - wish Taylor could view that.
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    Duchess is rather a short legged corgi. If we have deep snow like the last two storms, it is hard for her to slough through it and find a place to potty. We break a trail and she will do her thing and then next time she wants a new spot to use. Hardly ever the same place twice.

    If however the snow is just a few inches she loves to run and cavort. Yes, cavort is the right word. She is not a terribly playful dog so any rolling and prancing is a treat to see.

    I imagine Bailey is a taller dog. Ten inches would just about bury Duchess. She cannot make headway in over seven inches,
    Those photos were a short detour off the dirt road with tire tracks to walk in. Only a few feet away from the hard pack. The foot trail was packed down and was half way between hard pack and soft snow. It was slow going.

    He's not taller than any typical Corgi. He's just about perfect show dog confirmation.
    It depends on a lot of things how one particular dog will do in the deep snow.
    Bailey is two and has lots of energy. He hops like a bunny and and I don't let him go far at all in the deep. I watch to see how much work it is for him.
    We walk in a car tire track that is packed down. Or a trail that is packed by walkers.

    Also the consistency of the snow can be like powder, paste or cement and about a million things in between. That makes a huge difference too. Today he was walking up on the solid crust without sinking in, right where I took those photos.

    Of course I did not stay up on the crust. Whew!

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