Diabetes

This is a discussion on Diabetes within the Health Issues & Questions forums, part of the Health & Wellness category; Hello, I just confirmed today at the vet specialist that my four year-old male corgi, Dylan has diabetes. While at ...

  1. #1
    halpey1's Avatar
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    Diabetes

    Hello, I just confirmed today at the vet specialist that my four year-old male corgi, Dylan has diabetes. While at first I was so sad about the prospect of this, the more I'm learning about it, the less disheartened I am about it. The vet says it is not very common in Pembrokes... I'm wondering if anyone has a Corgi or knows one with diabetes? I love my guy so much, she's assured me once they figure out his insulin he'll be able to live a regular, normal life. Thanks for any input!
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    SparklingSparky's Avatar
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    So sad. What you have feed him daily ? rice, fruits, others sweet things ?
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    LaRogue's Avatar
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    I personally don't know any, but two of my vet's other corgi patients have had diabetes.
  4. #4
    halpey1's Avatar
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    I'd love to hear how any corgis anyone might know with diabetes have done, either short or long term... my guys is spending the night at the vets while they make sure they have his insulin amount right... it's sad here with only one corgi! My other one is all confused about where his brother is!
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    Diabetes in dogs is in the news lately and the general consensus is that the incidence of dabetes is on the increase and one of the major reasons is overweight/obesity. If this is the cae then Corgis chould not be exempt because a great many of them are overweight. In many cases diabetes goes untreated for a long time because it has been in a mild form. Untreated diabetes can also lead to other major problems.
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    I had a rescue foster that was diabetic. She was super about having her injections, would come right up when I was getting the syringe ready (of course it meant a cookie after wards <VBG>). I don't remember any special diet, just monitor her weight like any other corgi. She was a real sweet girl and went to a home where the wife was a RN.

    Debbie
  7. #7
    halpey1's Avatar
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    The irony is my little guy, Dylan, is very trim, fit, and active. He weighs, just barely 31 pounds... oh well, I'm excited to pick him up after work today and just have him home!
  8. #8
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    I am so sorry that your pup has diabetes.. I don't have experience with Dogs and diabetes but i did have a diabetic cat that i was able to manage for over 5 yrs... She finally passed NOT from diabetes but at the age of 16 1/2 from kidney failure.

    the first thing i would tell you is that you should go to google and see if there are any forums for diabetic dogs. i know a great one for diabetic cats ( FDMB-Feline Diabetes Medical Board- here is the link if you know anyone with a diabetic cat Feline Diabetes :: FDMB Health )

    With cats the diets often prescribed by doctors is still too high in carbs and will cause blood sugar spikes. I also know that in most cases the vets would have you shooting insuline twice a day without knowing where their blood sugar is , this is dangerous in my opinion- pretesting gives you an idea of where they are, so you dont shoot insulin to a pet that doesnt need it. Too much insulin is very dangerous.. I discovered this when i had my cat go into insulin shock (prior to my doing pre meal blood tests). I followed this board's advice about very low carb food mostly meat, and mostly canned, i learned to test the blood sugar using a human glucometer ( same as what people use to prick their finger... and on a cat you do the edge of the ear, it doenst hurt them and they dont notice... you get a reading and then know what is safe to inject for insulin. The insulin shots are very easy to give and the needle is super thin. A good place to get your supplies cheap would be at Hocks.Com - Diabetic Supplies and More. you would really want to make sure you know what supplies to get first but once you do, you can save a lot of money going there.

    This disease, i was initially told, was very hard to manage, etc, but I found it was not hard at all... you just need to be very routine and consistant.. and they can have a wonderful full life.

    I know most of this knowledge is about feline diabetes, but maybe you can take something away from it. I wish you the best in your journey to learn as much info as you can about his treatment and care....

    Emilie
  9. #9
    MyPemCharlie's Avatar
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    Well, I'm so sorry to hear about Dylan. From what I understand, diabetes is manageable and Dylan can still have a good quality of life.

    I would agree with Emilie on finding a good canine diabetes support forum to see what is working for different owners. There are a lot of lists available so I can't really recommend one in particular.

    I'm sure Dylan will be very happy to get back home today. Please do keep us posted on his progress. Letting us know how he is doing will help others with diabetic Corgis.
    Chris & Charlie

    He Ain't Heavy, He's My Corgi!
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    Glad to hear he'll be home with you soon. Not dismissing the seriousness of diabetes in any way, the little foster girl I had was an easy keeper overall. The idea of giving her shots everyday at first was a little intimidating and overwhelming, but it came to be a part of the routine. The diabetes wasn't the reason she came into rescue either. She came from a military family; husband was recently deployed and the wife and two small children moved back in with her parents who had a dog that didn't get along with the corgi.

    Debbie
  11. #11
    Jane Austen's Avatar
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    My Duchess is 28 pounds and a little on the chubby side. Her ideal weight is about 23 lbs.
    31 lbs sounds a tad heavy for a Pembroke. Not that Dylan is not in good shape but maybe he is carrying a pound or two more than is good for him? I know every dog is different. I don't mean to imply that he is overweight, but it jumped out at me when I saw 31 lbs and no one else commented.
    We are all concerned about Dylans health and the prognosis.
    Does giving insulin tend to add to the problem of corgis putting on too much weight?
    Best wishes for Dylan's good health.
    Last edited by Jane Austen; 11-20-2008 at 07:26 AM.
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    halpey1's Avatar
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    Just got him home - he is THRILLED to be home. I will give him his first shot tonight... I practiced at the vet with saline and it wasn't too bad - the needle is TINY. He's actually quite trim at 31 pounds... he's VERY active so I don't think he'll have a problem with getting overweight, but I'm very strict with food and treats... I'll give an update soon! Thanks for all the support, I'm going to look for the canine diabetes support forum soon - if anyone knows of an active one, I'd appreciate the recommendation!
  13. #13
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    Try these groups:
    diabetes_insipidus_dogs : Diabetes Insipidus_dogs
    diabetespet : Pet Diabetes

    Genetics also plays a part in diabetes. There are other things that can cause/trigger it besides being overweight.

    Peggy
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    Jim & Peggy Newman
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  14. #14
    ShannonRD's Avatar
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    Diabetes insipidus is actually a different condition than diabetes mellitus and is much less common (at least that is true in case of humans) and does not involve abnormalities in blood glucose. I provide diabetes education as part of my job and would not feel at all comfortable giving insulin without taking a blood glucose level first. I would see if the vet could write a prescription for one of the newer lancets that uses a barrel of needles inside--all you have to do is cock it, and you never actually see the needle; it's really easy to use. The Accu-Chek Aviva has a nice lancet device. As for diet, the most important this is to keep the amount of carbohydrate consistent at each feeding and to have consistent meal times. I would not recommend feeding less than three times a day. It is important to also have a mixture of fat and protein with the carbohydrate, as this will prevent a rapid spike and then drop in blood sugar. In the case of hypoglycemia, I would definitely make sure the vet gives an emergency glucagon injection, since it's much more difficult to know how your pet is feeling when they can't always communicate such (that and some people I work with don't even get typical symptoms of hypoglycemia before it's too late, so they MUST check their glucose levels). If you low blood sugars on their way down, we use the 15-15 rule: 15g of rapidly absorbed carbohydrate (juice, regular soda, or glucose tabs) and test again after 15 min--if still low, repeat. I'm not sure if they have special products for dogs or if they'd drink juice/soda. Low blood sugar can be life-threatening, at which point I would not care that soda is not nutritious. Also, if you know your dog will be doing a large amount of exercise, I would be sure he gets some carbohydrates before and after exercise, only because I don't know what typical blood glucose levels are for dogs and how many carbs they need. For humans, it is recommended to test blood sugar first and then determine if it is necessary to eat first, and to test every 30 min during exercise.
  15. #15
    MyPemCharlie's Avatar
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    Since dogs process foods differently than humans, I believe diabetic dogs do best with a diet low in carbohydrates and fats, and high in proteins and fiber. I think carbs or any processed types of sugar should be avoided.

    Did the vet make any particular diet recommendations for Dylan?
    Chris & Charlie

    He Ain't Heavy, He's My Corgi!
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